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Zero to Hero: How to Be the Best Boss Ever

Illustration for article titled Zero to Hero: How to Be the Best Boss Ever

Are you new to being a boss? Or do you feel like your staff hates you? Then you need a bit of help to improve the situation. Why? The more your staff respect and like you as a boss, the more productive they would be. Having a great leader inspires people to do better in their jobs. Even if you consider yourself as a good boss, you need to be continuously improving. Just as your team members are growing every day, you should also be learning more each day.

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Some bosses fuel productivity with the use of fear. It may work for a while, but it harbours an unfavourable environment for the whole team. Plus, it would probably only work while you are around. Fuel great performance with respect instead. Show your members respect, and they will give it back to you and the company.

What qualities should you develop so that you can become the best boss ever?

Illustration for article titled Zero to Hero: How to Be the Best Boss Ever
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1. Great bosses are good listeners.

Effective communication is the key to many things. And it is definitely one of the keys of effective leadership. If you can effectively communicate with your staff, then things are going to get done smoothly with minimal issues. Great bosses transparently communicate with their team members individually and together as a collective unit. Managing information and instructions this way ensures that everyone has the information they need.

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2. Great bosses are good with adapting to the needs of each one of their team members.

Great bosses know their own strengths and weaknesses. On top of understanding their own skills, they also take time to know each one of their team members. Everyone has their own work style, and a great boss would take time to analyse how their team operates with the many different workstyles available. They check where things overlap and where there are differences.

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Understanding all this information allows them to adapt their management style and approach for each one of the members reporting to them. A good boss knows what approach works best, but a great boss knows that what works for one person might not work for another.

3. Great bosses do their best to set a healthy and positive environment.

Illustration for article titled Zero to Hero: How to Be the Best Boss Ever
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Good bosses can direct people to the right places, but a great boss knows that positive feedback is one of the key drivers of a top-performing team. They acknowledge their members when they do good, and they make sure that each member feels appreciated. Not only do they give out positive feedback, but they also make sure that they cultivate an environment where each team members know how to recognise a job well done. By creating an appreciative environment, great bosses are able to promote a healthy and positive environment where their members can work in peace.

4. Great bosses know when a conflict is healthy.

Not all conflicts are bad, and great bosses know how to differentiate destructive conflicts from constructive ones. Great bosses know how to create cultures of collaboration. They take advantage of all the diverse perspectives on their team to come up, which is better than approaching a task individually. The team gets to hear different opinions and decisions on the matter. Great bosses know how to conduct a group discussion where everyone feels included in the process, has a chance to express their opinions and have their ideas be heard.

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Great bosses can both support and lead their team in a group discussion while still cultivating an environment that promotes and encourages productive conflict.

The word conflict has a negative connotation for most people, but great bosses know that there are two kinds of conflicts: a destructive conflict which is based on ego, politics, and competition. In contrast, productive conflict is unfiltered, the passionate debate around issues that are important to the success of a team.

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5. Lastly, great bosses do not fear failure.

Some bosses are too afraid of failure that they forget about the welfare of their team. Great bosses do not operate this way. Again, it is not a good idea to fuel productivity with fear. Great bosses set their employees up for success. They take responsibility for jumping in and helping when obstructions need to be moved out of the way.

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They don’t expect their team to do a task perfectly on the first try, instead of getting mad about a few setbacks, they encourage their team to learn from the experience.

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